Dogora

Last updated by Darren on 22 February 2010

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Dogora is a film capturing the lives of the people of Cambodia.  Dogora was created by Patrice Leconte, and is currently only available on a French release.  Dogora has not plot, actors or script.  Dogora is similar in style to Baraka and Koyaanisqatsi.

Dogora captures the daily routines of the people of Cambodia.  Dogora is a street level documentary, without any explanation.  Your imagination must answer any questions you may have.  Dogora captures the interaction between the people of Cambodia very well.  Particular attention is paid to the children of Cambodia, which prove a fascinating subject.

For people that have seen Baraka or Koyaanisqatsi, Dogora will have a familiar style.  Dogora has a more precise subject matter than the other films, but uses many of the same techniques to present the subject.

There are several note worthy scenes in Dogora.  The moped scene, where the various passengers of many different mopeds are shown.  Its amazing what can be carried on a moped.  There are several long scenes in Dogora, which work very well.  The everyday lives of people travelling, sleeping, eating, working and playing are all shown in a natural manner.  Sweatshop factories and rubbish dumps are shown, giving a reminder of the poverty found in Cambodia.  However the obvious images of Angkor Wat and other temples are not present.  The start of the film shows fine painting of the temples, but no real images are shown.  This is clearly a deliberate decision.

Several scenes in which monks are shown are deliberately out of focus.  The scenes continue for some time, allowing the viewer to understand the images and what they mean, without actually seeing the subject clearly.

The musical score of Dogora was created by Étienne Perruchon.  The music was scored before the film was shot.  Patrice Leconte listened to tapes of the score whilst shooting, to set the scene and add rhythm to the shot.  The score is surprisingly not traditionally Eastern.  Choirs and classical music make the score, which can seem a little mis-fitting at times.  The chants used in the recordings are an invention of the composer, which he called ‘Dogorienne’, this is where Dogora takes its name.

Ron Fricke explored the spiritual world in Baraka, Godfrey Reggio explored the relationship between man, nature and technology in the Qatsi trilogy.  Patrice Leconte does not seem to show such a theme in Dogora.  Instead he concentrates on the people of Cambodia.

Patrice Leconte explains that he always dreamed of making a film without actors, a plot or script.  Clearly inspired by Ron Fricke and Godfrey Reggio's work.  After a visit to Cambodia Leconte concentrated on creating Dogora, which has become a personal film for him.

Dogora was filmed in Panavision HD Cam, with Patrice Leconte controlling the camera.  The images are stunning, with vibrant colors, capturing the bustling life around the camera well. 

 

Images

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DVD

The Dogora DVD is released by TF1 in France only.  The DVD is region 2.  As the film has no dialogue subtitles are not required.  However, the extra features are not subtitled.  If you do not understand spoken French well the extras are a visual only experience.  The extras give a good behind the scenes glimpse into the making of the film.

The Dogora DVD contains an excellent 36 page booklet, although it is entirely in French.  It contains a diary of the shooting of the film.

Credits

  • Director - Patrice Leconte
  • Music - Etienne Perruchon
  • Editing - Joelle Hache
  • Has the tag line Ouvrons les yeux, which translates as 'Let us open the eyes'

As long as there's such beauty and innocence, such music and such children's eyes - this planet is worth living on!
Definitely makes me want to go there and stay forever!

Lovely to see that people of 2004 are the same entities of now.
As said before in these comments: the people aren't smilling like they do in Cambodja; subjects of are sometimes cut of early; nice switches between dances and working people; music that sounds `strange`. But whatever a viewer and/or lover of films does recognise, is the care how the movie is made by the crew in Cambodja and by the orchestra and choir.

Art in viewing becomes fresh as long as viewers are satisfied with the result they saw. In this case Dogora does fill up your mind everytime you watch and listen.
This is why we don't need words and why these types of movies always will touch peoples hart.

Enjoy it forever and feel yourself one with the world!

Ps. We are starting to make non-vebal film ourself what (hopely) will be ready in 2011.
The film shall be showing the African culture of Burkina Faso; one of the most poor countries in the world. About her nature, her inhabitants, the music and religion.
Watch out for it! We will contact `Spirit of Baraka` when it's ready!

H. van Lierop & I. Verstraten (Holland)

Apsolutely WRONG choice of music in movie...!!!
What's that, bulgarian or russian ethno music for the movie about people in Cambodia? I could't watch the movie to the end because of music that put me in Moscow, not in Cambodia!

Greetings from Serbia!

There are some scenes that make Dogora stand out: I appreciate the dancing overlays with the kickboxing, for example.

On the whole, however, where the Qatsi trilogy could hold shots into the eyes of subjects on a neutral basis, when it's done in Dogora I can't help but felt uncomfortably voyeuristic. Perhaps it's just a matter of the passing of twenty years of time, where worldwide people are aware of what a camera means now. Whatever the reason, I don't think it works as well here.

Like the new look of the site. Lynton

i loved the picture and the music but my daughter told me : how can one make film about cambodia without a smile??????????????????????????????? and i thought : she's right! i d like an answer from patrice leconte, even in french!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!cordially [email protected]

After viewing pictures,as film suggesting laissez penser,it is worthy thousand texts in each scene.See to believe pictures are astounding of men against environmental suppression at own resilience.

This page triggered nervous system systemically.Thousands word spat out in individual m ind as eyes gazed pictures.
Awesomely presentation,thank you for sharing.

After wiewed Baraka I have understood how great is the humanity, and how we are all the same thing.
We have a big power intelligence, fantasy, love....where is this kind of world, why we are loosing this......??
Stay in peace .
Ciao from the planet Hearth.

you forgot to mention the most incredible music score by Etienne Perruchon!

I have traveled a lot during my life, but I must commit that one of the best (short) trips I ever made was at home sitting on my couch watching ‘Baraka’.
Most amazing shots taken from mother earth, wonderful edited into a movie that let your mouth stand wide open. An inspiration for life.

I came across this film being played in a qiuet cafe on my last eve in Cambodia after 3 magical weeks there. I cried but yet it sums up perfectly such an amazing and stunning but yet simple country and people. A must for anyone who has been or is thinking of going.

Actually..I was one of those,which made the music..me and mu choire..and..that music was made in Bulgaria :]]

P.S.The film is really interesting..it's a little bit strange..but it's good.. :]] You shoul'd see it..

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